There are times when profanity offers relief that even prayer cannot provide.

AndrewDiceClay

There are times when profanity offers relief that even prayer cannot provide.

I don’t remember where I read this, but it is so very true. Once in a great while, a situation arises that needs a really good swear word to relieve the tension, frustration, absurdity (fill in your own favorite word here) of the moment. The problem is that today, people use swear words in place of an adjective — “That was a f***ing great movie, wasn’t it?”

If used in everyday onversation, what do these people say when they really need to let out a good curse? Using the same word after, say, dropping a hammer on one’s foot seems almost anticlimactic after using it three dozen times in the past hour to describe more mundane things.

We have comedians, such as Richard Pryor and Andrew Dice Clay, who helped to make cursing an acceptable part of everyday conversation. When they first began used profanity in their monologues, people laughed because it caught them by surprise and made the tale being told alarmingly funny. Lately, however, I’ve stopped going to comedy clubs because the so-called comedians use swearing cosntantly and nothing after the word is particularly funny.

So, where do I stand on swearing? I firmly believe that there are times when it is warranted. The rest of the time, when it is used in the course of a normal conversation, it is completely uncalled for.

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